What Sculpture Is And What It’s Not

Sculpture is the two or three dimensional representation of forms, abstract or not using various shaping techniques.Nathaniel Hawthorne, an American writer wrote that “moonlight is sculpture”, Chuck Close,  an American painter/photographer said “sculpture occupies real space like we do… you walk around it and relate to it almost as another person or another object” and Leonardo Da Vinci, Italian renaissance man, said “i have been impressed with the urgency of doing. knowing is not enough; we must apply. being willing is not enough; we must do.”

What is sculpture if not application of knowledge and doing?

What sculpting means to me, i feel i can only capture in a sculpture, a 3D representation of emotions, to capture the intangible. Oh! the feeling, the rush. I think sculpture differentiates itself from the written art forms immediately because in my own words “Sculpture describes perfectly what words strive to limn”.

Sculpture is many things we shall see shortly

  1. Sculpture is beauty and so is the goddess Aphrodite

This Crouching Aphrodite marble statue is a Roman variant of the 2nd century CE after a Hellenistic type. It depicts Aphrodite as bathing, crouching with her right knee close to the ground. (Louvre Museum). Photo by Carole Raddato, CC-BY-SA.

This marble statue is a Roman variant of the 2nd century CE after a Hellenistic type. It depicts Aphrodite as bathing, crouching with her right knee close to the ground. (Louvre Museum). Photo by Carole Raddato

2. Sculpture is tough

The boxer of Quirinal, also known as the Terme Boxer, is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture dated around 330 B.C. of a sitting boxer with Caestus, a type of leather hand-wrap, in the collection of the National Museum of Rome. It is one of the two unrelated bronzes (the other being the unidentified Hellenistic Ruler) discovered on the slopes of the Quirinal within a month of each other in 1885, possibly from the remains of the Baths of Constantine. It appears that both had been carefully buried in antiquity. The statue is a masterpiece of Hellenistic athletic professionalism, with a top-heavy over-muscled torso and scarred face, cauliflower ears, broken nose, and a mouth suggesting broken teeth. Photo by Irene Fanizzia, Public Domain.

The boxer of Quirinal, , is a Greek sculpture dated around 330 B.C. It shows a boxer with Caestus, a type of leather hand-wrap, in the collection of the National Museum of Rome. It had been carefully buried in antiquity. The statue is a masterpiece of Hellenistic athletic professionalism, with a top-heavy over-muscled torso and scarred face, cauliflower ears, broken nose, and a mouth suggesting broken teeth. Photo by Irene Fanizzia

3. Sculpture is Pain

A 5th century BCE marble sculpture of one of the daughters of Niobe, dying from an arrow wound in her back. According to the story from Greek mythology Niobe insulted the goddess Lato by thinking herself more worthy. Lato then had her children Apollo and Artemis strike down Niobe's children with their deadly arrows. (Palazzo Massimo, Rome). Photo by Mark Cartwright, CC-BY-NC-SA.

A 5th century BCE marble sculpture of one of the daughters of Niobe, dying from an arrow wound in her back. According to Greek mythology, Niobe insulted the goddess Lato by thinking herself more worthy. Lato had her children Apollo and Artemis strike down Niobe’s children with their deadly arrows. (Palazzo Massimo, Rome). Photo by Mark Cartwright

4. Sculpture is Pleasure

This beautiful bronze sculpture can be found in Loveland, Jeju, Korea

What sculpture is not is obsolete, ghastly, and it definitely is not dead.

Am i right or right?

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